Tag Archives: olympus

Less is More: Megapixels

This is a re-post of my original from 2012.

The first question I ask when talking to a customer about what camera they should buy is “What are you looking for in a new camera?” The most common answer is “I want the highest megapixels”. Seeming to think that the more megapixels a camera has the better quality image it will produce.

An idea perpetrated by modern manufacturers who cram as many megapixels into a camera as possible; I’m not going to bore you with lots of techno jargon as all I want to do is prove that megapixels aren’t the most important factor when buying a camera.

One of my favourite cameras is to this day the 3 megapixel Minolta Dimage Z1. This camera had a wonderful f/2.8 lens with macro focusing as close as 1.5 inches, and as you can see from the image below (taken in my parent’s garden) only having 3 megapixels definitely didn’t create a sub-par image.

Minolta 3.0 MP Frog

Now sadly I no longer have the original image, this one was cropped, level corrected and enlarged and I think for a 3.0 MP camera looks amazing!

Below are a few more shots from the Z1 again they have been edited but they are still all below 1 Mb in size.

 

 

Minolta 3.0 MP Frog 2

Minolta 3.0 MP Madinat

MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAMinolta 3.0 MP Burj Al Arab 2

My first digital camera – Olympus C-220

Now this bad boy cost over £200 and had a stonking 2 megapixels! At the time this was state of the art and a real honour to own. So much so that I took it to a family wedding and ended up taking the shot of the day with it. The couple still have this image on their mantelpiece and the hired ‘pro’ didn’t get the shot!

Olympus 2.0 MP Wedding Photo

This image shows a really interesting anomaly where the bokeh appears in small rings, an effect common when using a mirror lens.

Olympus 2.0 MP Crab

The main drawback with low megapixel cameras is that the image cannot be enlarged to any bigger that A3, but how many general users actually do that? I have had these image enlarged to 8×10 and they still look great with no hint of pixelisation.

 

So remember less can be more in regards to megapixels but, bigger is always better when it comes to lenses!

In my next post i will discuss music photography, from equipment to etiquette and how to get the best images.

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